Fed to keep monetary policy easy, stay patient

26 February, 2021 12:00 AM printer

WASHINGTON: Amid market expectations the Fed may be forced to tighten monetary policy sooner than expected, top U.S. central bankers delivered a simple message to investors fixated on rising U.S. bond yields and price risks: Do not expect any changes until the economy is clearly improving.

Testifying on Wednesday before the House of Representatives Financial Services Committee, Fed Chair Jerome Powell emphasized the U.S. central bank’s promise to get the economy back to full employment, with little worry about inflation unless prices begin rising in a persistent and troubling way, report agencies.

“We are just being honest about the challenge,” Powell told lawmakers when asked about Fed projections that inflation will remain at or below the central bank’s 2% target through 2023.

The Fed has said it will not raise interest rates until inflation has exceeded 2% and “we believe we can do it, we believe we will do it. It may take more than three years,” Powell said. The current inflation rate by the Fed’s preferred measure is about 1.3%.

An expected jump in prices this spring, he said, may reflect post-pandemic supply bottlenecks, or a jump in demand as the economy reopens, but nothing to warrant a policy response. Powell’s remarks led a broad central bank effort to convince the public and particularly bond market investors that it is not going to tighten monetary policy until it is clear people are getting back to work.

Yields on U.S. Treasury bonds have risen recently, with the risk of a potential spike in inflation in focus as the United States expands its coronavirus vaccination program, plans further fiscal spending and moves toward a post-pandemic reopening of the economy.

Financial markets are pricing in a better outlook for the U.S. economy, and “that’s appropriate,” Fed Vice Chair Richard Clarida told the American Chamber of Commerce in Australia, adding he had become more bullish himself in recent months.

What that does not mean, he said, is any imminent change to the Fed’s near-zero setting for short-term interest rates, or its bond-buying program.

“We to a person are going to be patient, we are going to be very careful, and we are going to be very, very transparent of our intentions well in advance of any decision we might make in the future,” Clarida said.

Clarida said he sees inflation rising above 2% in the spring but coming back down to about that level by year’s end.

Talk about a possible market “taper tantrum” in response to a change in the Fed’s bond-buying program is “premature,” Clarida said. A taper tantrum refers to a rapid run-up in bond yields based on changes in market expectations for Fed policy.


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