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Flooding in upper Meghna basin may worsen

  • Staff Correspondent
  • 25 August, 2021 12:00 AM
  • Print news
Flooding in upper Meghna basin may worsen

Flooding in the upper Meghna basin may deteriorate due to a rise in the water levels of the Teesta, Dharala, Dudhkumar, Brahmaputra and other major rivers.

Moderate to heavy rain may occur in the northern and northeastern regions of the country along with places of adjoining Sub-Himalayan West Bengal, Assam and Meghalaya states of India in the next 72 hours from 9:00am on Tuesday that may deteriorate the flood situation, according to a forecast of Flood Forecasting and Warning Centre (FFWC).

Meanwhile, people living in low-lying areas of Kurigram, Rangpur, Sirajganj, Pabna, Kushtia, Manikganj, Rajbari, Faridpur and Shariatpur districts have been leading a miserable life due to the deluge since last week.

Thousands of flood victims in the submerged areas have been left without inadequate relief, locals said.

“The Brahmaputra River may swell and the Jamuna may remain steady, the Ganges is in falling trend and the Padma is in a steady state,” said Arifuzzaman Bhuiyan, executive engineer at the FFWC.

The major rivers in the northeastern part of the country are showing a rising trend which may continue, he said, adding that the Teesta River at Dalia point and the Surma at Kanaighat point may cross the danger level in the next 24-48 hours.

The flood situation in the low-lying areas of Pabna, Manikganj, Rajbari, Faridpur and Shariatpur districts may remain unchanged, Ariful said. The Jamuna River at Mathura and Aricha points, Atrai at Baghabari, Padma at Goalundo, Sureswar and Bhagyakul, Dhaleswari at Elasin, Meghna at Chandpur and Gorai at Kamarkhali points were flowing above the red mark.

Huge onrush of water from the upstream inundated large areas in many districts and caused serious river erosion in the northeastern and central regions.

Local sources said massive river erosion is adding woes to the flood-affected people.

 A large number of houses, structures, trees and crops on a vast tract of land were washed away by flood waters and strong currents of rivers in different flood-hit areas.