Thursday, 23 September, 2021
E-paper

Double whammy awaits us!

Double whammy awaits us!

Amid the coronavirus pandemic, the surge of dengue patients is alarmingly increasing day by day across the country, especially in the capital, putting the lives of city dwellers at great risk. Hitherto killing at least 26 lives (36 unofficially) this year, the mosquito-borne disease has infected more than 4,000 people this month, taking the total number of infected people to over 6,650 this year, almost five times higher than that in the previous year. The most alarming fact is that over 200 people have been hospitalised every day in the last fortnight, which marks a sharp rise compared to the previous month. Statistics of DGHS suggest that the country is going to face a double whammy of coronavirus and dengue in the coming days if we fail to control these diseases.

Having a little medication dengue fever may be a real threat anytime, worsening the overall medical facilities that have been facing a hard time for the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. Shutting down corona units or reducing the number of beds, the authorities of many hospitals are reportedly opening dengue units now, which would surely add to woes of beds scarcity for Covid-19 patients, if the situation deteriorates further. The harsh reality is our healthcare system is yet to be developed to tackle both diseases at a time.

Therefore, the preventive measures to manage dengue fever, mosquito control in particular, would have been the best possible way. However, we have failed to do so, especially in the capital, where the situation is very dangerous. Maybe the authorities concerned have given their total concentration on coronavirus and made a little effort to mosquito control. If full-fledged attempts were made, they would have succeeded like in the previous year.

At the same time, there must have been some negligence from the mass people, who also have a significant role to play in tackling dengue fever. All members of our society should keep their houses and surroundings neat and clean responding to the awareness campaign the authorities are conducting for years and considering the fact that a little amount of stagnant water, even equivalent of a teaspoon of water, is enough to lay eggs and give birth to adult mosquitoes. It is almost impossible for the authorities concerned to control the mosquito population single-handedly and without the participation of the masses. There is no way to neglect our respective duties.