30 newborns die per 1,000 live births

Says an icddr,b report

Staff Correspondent

4 February, 2021 12:00 AM printer

Thirty newborns per 1,000 live births die in Bangladesh for various reasons, including premature birth and low birth weight (LBW), according to a report of icddr,b.

The scenario of death of newborn babies was presented at an evidence sharing session with journalists at the icddr’b in the capital’s Mohakhali on Wednesday.

Dr Ahmed Ehsanur Rahman, associate scientist of icddr,b, made the keynote presentation at the session chaired by Dr Shams El Arifeen, Senior Director, Maternal & Child Health Division (MCHD) of icddr,b. Fourteen health reporters from eminent media houses attended the session.

The keynote speech said over the past few decades, Bangladesh has made significant strides in reducing newborn death. The Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey (BDHS) data showed a declining trend in newborn death until 2014.

However, the last BDHS 2017-18 report alarmingly shows that the rate has bounced back. Per 1,000 live births, 30 newborn children die in Bangladesh. Of this number, a staggering 19 percent is accounted for by premature birth and low birth weight (LBW) combined.

The programme discussed the prematurity and LBW burden in Bangladesh, innovations and interventions to reduce the burden and importance of bringing positive changes in the mindset of the care seekers in an evidence sharing session with the health bit reporters.

The session was organised by USAID supported Research for Decision Makers (RDM) activity of icddr,b and Data for Impact (D4I) as part of an advocacy effort to sensitise and encourage journalists to report on ways to reduce preventable deaths among children.

Prof Mohammad Shahidullah, Chairman, National Technical Working Committee on Newborn Health, and Dr Sayed Rubayet, Country Director, Ipas Bangladesh, attended the session as technical experts.  Dr Kanta Jamil, Senior Monitoring, Evaluation & Research advisor at USAID/Bangladesh, also took part in the event.


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