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HC’s rule on stopping PUBG and Free Fire

World Vision Bangladesh congratulates petitioners

World Vision Bangladesh congratulates petitioners
  • Staff Correspondent
  • 24th August, 2021 07:50:17 PM
  • Print news

As the High Court (HC) stopped all kinds of destructive online games and apps like PUBG and Free Fire, the World Vision Bangladesh appreciated two Supreme Court (SC) lawyers for filling the petition, a release said.

The WVB congratulated SC lawyers Mohammad Humayun Kabir Pallob and Mohammad Kawser as they filed the petition to stop all kinds of destructive online games and apps like PUBG and Free Fire to save children and adolescents from moral and social degradation.

A delegation of the organization led by Tony Michael Gomes, Director Communications, Advocacy, and External Engagement, met Humaun Kabir and congratulated him for his contribution towards child protection.

On August 16, the HC directed the government to put a stop to all kinds of ‘destructive’ online games and apps like PUBG and Free Fire for the next three months to ‘save children and adolescents from moral and social degradation’.

The court also issued a rule asking the authorities concerned of the government to explain in 10 days why their inaction to ban online games and apps like TikTok, Likee, Bigo Live, PUBG and Free Fire should not be declared illegal.

On June 24 this year, two SC lawyers filed a writ petition to the HC as a public interest litigation on behalf of rights organisation Law and Life Foundation.

In the petition, the lawyers said that the country’s youths and adolescents are being addicted to online games such as PUBG and Free Fire, and various online platforms like TikTok, Likee and Bigo Live.

They, termed the trend as ‘alarming’, and highlighted the adverse effects of such mobile-phone based applications on the young generations and shed light on the opportunities they provide for criminal activities.

The HC asked the authorities concerned to take steps to remove harmful games including PUBG and Free Fire from online platforms in Bangladesh.

Later, the court issued a rule seeking explanation as to why all types of online games and apps like Tiktok, Bigo Live, PUBG, Free Fire Games and Likee should not be banned.